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Acanthurus lineatus thumbnail

leebca @ Acanthurus lineatus am 11.11.06

Called the "Clown Tang" in North America, this fish is very attractive. However, it comes with a downside -- it can be a very agressive fish in a community tank. For reasons unknown it may take a dislike to another fish -- one that doesn't even look like it or a fish that isn't a competitor -- and chase it quite often. Should only be kep in a community tank with fishes that are assertive. If not, then this fish will 'take over' a tank and assume the top of the 'pecking order.' About the only other common marine tang that is more agressive is the Sohol Tang. The Clown Tang must have daily access to marine algae and fed a hervivore diet (and some pods). Quarantine for proper acclimation and to verify it is disease-free is important in properly introducing this fish into a large display tank. This fish needs a lot of swimming room, even for a small specimen.

Zebrasoma desjardinii thumbnail

leebca @ Zebrasoma desjardinii am 11.11.06

One of the easy to keep of the Sailfin family. This Sailfin however gets large (about twice the size of the other common ones) and needs a lot of space. It will eat most omnivore and herbivore foods and should be provided marine algae daily. Its idsposition is a bit aggressive toward competitors and those fishes it perceives as a possible competitor. It will fair well in a community tank with fishes that are assertive. Tends to hide a lot, but with a proper quarantine process and acclimation, this fish will be a very attractive addition to the large display tank.

Chaetodon burgessi thumbnail

leebca @ Chaetodon burgessi am 11.11.06

Relatively easy Butterflyfish to keep. If quarantined properly and introduced to captive life by stages, it will do very well. After a time, this fish may boss around other fishes even larger than itself. It is not reclusive and swims in the open most of the time. It seems to often be curious about what is on the other side of the aquarium wall. The Burgess will eat most typical omnivore foods and even pick at seaweed and algae sheets provided to tangs and other herbivores.

Chaetodon fasciatus thumbnail

leebca @ Chaetodon fasciatus am 28.02.06

This Red Sea Racoon is often available to North Americans. It is a hardy fish, resisting many diseases to which other butterflyfish seem to succumb. It will tolerate less-than-perfect water quality, for short times.

Getting it to eat can be a challenge, but most will 'follow the leader' and eat what other community tank members wil eat. It is sometimes not assertive at feeding times and may become reclusive.

However, as always with most butterflyfishes, it is best to put into quarantine in order to get it eating different foods, and to get it used to humans (as well as to be sure it is disease-free). If the aquarist will diligently do this, the fish will start off right and quickly learn who and where its food comes from.

It likes mostly meaty foods (chopped clam, scallop, mysis and brine shrimp. It can get used to most kinds of omnivore foods for marine fishes.

Chaetodon declivis thumbnail

leebca @ Chaetodon declivis am 28.02.06

I find the Declivis Butterflyfish a relatively easy fish to acclimate to aquarium life. It eats many different kinds of food and asserts itself at feeding time, in a community tank. What many aquarists don't realize is that this fish, along with the Tinker's Butterflyfish, enjoy eating a bit of macro algae. Provide fresh algae or dried packaged sheets of nori or algae daily like you would a tang, and it will enjoy that fair.

As always with most butterflyfishes, it is best to put into quarantine in order to get it eating different foods, and to get it used to humans (as well as to be sure it is disease-free).

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